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How to Paint a Monogram on Furniture

Furniture makeover: How to paint your monogram on a stool or any piece of furniture.  Step-by-step furniture painting tutorial.

Last week I went to Walmart to find something to paint a monogram on with craft paint for my daughter. She is moving into an apartment in August and I am helping her with the furnishings.  Plaid – you know the craft people that make tons of awesome craft supplies recently sent me a craft supply filled package as part of a fun Plaid campaign – buying Plaid products at Walmart.

Along with my Plaid package of crafty goodness, I was also sent a $25.00 dollar gift card to Walmart to shop the craft aisle and pick out an item to add my own style to.  I browsed the Plaid section in the Walmart craft department and was amazed at all the product that they carry.  Then I strolled around the store a few times looking for something my daughter could use to personalize with craft paint. I considered many items, but in the end I chose this black Saddle Stool. Exactly $25 – the amount I was to spend.    My daughter is a horse lover and having this stool in her new place will add a bit of equestrian style to her new apartment. I personalized it just for her by painting her initials in the center.  She loves it.

Walmart-stool

Step-by-Step-Instructions-2

Plaid-paints-at-Walmart

How to Paint a Monogram on Furniture

Supplies Needed:

Folk Art craft paint in White Enamel
Folk Art craft paint in Black
Plaid Foam Roller top
Paint brushes – both flat and pointy
Monogram print out
Saddle Stool – needs to be assembled after you paint the top.
Non-yellowing spray sealer in a satin finish
Sandpaper
Transfer paper – I had some on hand – use a color so you will be able to see the transferred image on the black surface of the stool
Ruler
Pencil
Painter’s Tape
Scissors
Cotton Swaps

 See this post for a step-by-step photo tutorial on:

 How to make your monogram in Microsoft Word.   

How to make a monogram on a computer

I used Photoshop Elements to make the monogram.  I used the font Cursif. The ” H” is 340px.  The “K” and “C” are 24p px.   I then placed a circle around them.  There is a link at the end of the post to get the Cursif font. It is a freebie.

Monogram-stool-screenshot

I also made an image of a chevron pattern.  I printed both of them out on draft mode on my printer.  You don’t need these images to be high quality as they are just going to be used for tracing purposes.  I sized the monogram to be 8” x 8”.  The chevron pattern I fit to an 8 1/2” 11” page size.

Chevron pattern-and-monogram

I chose to paint the circle for the monogram first and do the chevron pattern after.  I wanted to make sure the circle was centered and in place before doing anything else, but you could trace the chevron first and then add the circle. No right or wrong way.

Cut the monogram out and make sure the chevron pattern is tall enough.

Transfer paper tutorial

Measure the center of the stool top and mark an X in the center.

Draw-circle

How to center a circle

To find the exact center of the monogram circle. fold it into quarters. Use the fold point as your center mark to line up on the “x” on the stool top.

DIY monogram

Place a piece of transfer paper – graphite/color side down and then center the monogram print-out over the X.  Use painter’s tape to secure.  Trace over the circle with a sharp pencil point. You don’t have to press hard – a little pressure is all that is needed to transfer the image. Trace over the inner and outer lines of the circle and then remove the print-out.

Painting a mongram

Hold a small piece of sandpaper in your hand and gently rub it over the circle to rough up the glossy finish so the paint will adhere better. Clean off the sanding grit with a tack cloth or damp paper towel.

Using a pointy craft brush, outline the inner pencil line of the circle with the white paint.

How-to use a foam craft paint roller

I chose to paint the circle first to make sure I had it centered, but as long as you have the outline drawn in white paint, you can wait to paint the circle until you have the chevron stripes taped on and then paint over the entire top at once.

Screw on a roller top to the white craft paint bottle and gently squeeze the bottle until paint fills the roller. Roll it on a scrap piece of paper first to get it going. Once the foam has paint all over it.  Roll the paint on inside the circle.   I did 3 coats – letting each coat dry before applying the next.

Chevron-pattern-drawing

To transfer the chevron pattern to the stool.  Lay transfer paper graphite side down and then place the chevron pattern over it making sure it is lined up straight. Tape it down to secure.  Using a sharp pencil trace the edges of the zig-zags .  Remove the print-out and transfer paper.  If you look closely at the photo above you can see the faint lines of the pattern.

How to draw chevron

Repeat on the other side of the stool making sure to line up the pattern.   If graphite from the transfer paper gets on the paint. Gently wipe it off with a damp rag.

How to draw a chevron pattern

Lay down the painter’s tape following the chevron pattern. Run your fingers over the edges of the tape to make sure they are sealed.   I added tape to the sides of the top -no pattern transfer needed.  You will see where to add the tape – just extend the zig-zag lines.

Run a piece of sandpaper over all the non-taped areas of the top and side of the stool. Remove the sanding dust with a tack cloth or damp towel.

How to draw a chevron pattern

Using the foam topped roller – roll over the top and edges with white paint.  If any areas need smoothing, use a flat tipped brush to even the rolled on surface out. Let it dry. I applied 3 coats to get full coverage.

How to draw a chevron pattern

Note: Very important –  Remove the tape right after applying the last coat of paint.  If you let it dry and  remove the tape – the paint will come off with the tape.   When I removed mine there were some areas that I needed to touch up. I used a small flat tip brush to do this.

How to make a monogram on a computer

Center the monogram print-out and transfer paper over the circle. Tape it down and then carefully trace over the letters with a sharp pencil.

How to use crafting transfer paper

When you remove the print-out and transfer paper you will be left with this.

How to make a monogram

My eyes needed a bit more stay-in-between-the-lines guidance, so before I started painting the letters, I went over the transferred lines with a fine tipped black marker. I used a fine tipped pointy brush to fill each letter in.  I did one coat and then went over a second time to clean up the edges that I messed up.

I used a flat tip brush to paint the circle around the monogram.  If you have any areas that need cleaning up use a pointy tip cotton swap to clean up any painted lines.

Paint-a-monogram-on-furnitu

Once the paint is touched up and dried. Spray 1-2 coats of non-yellowing sealer over the top, letting each coat dry before applying the next.

Furniture Painting Ideas

Now my daughter will have a place to store her horse gear or just use it to sit on.

How to make and paint a monogram on furniture

Click here to install the  Cursif free font on your computer.

Copy the chevron pattern to save on your computer to print.

Chevron-Pattern

I wrote this post as part of a paid campaign with Plaid Crafts and Blueprint Social. The opinions in this post are my own.

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50 Comments

  1. Hi Diane!
    I just found you on Pinterest and I’m loving your idea’s!! The stool is the one I just bought from Walmart, didn’t know what to do with it to dress it up a bit….Now I do! I’m posting this on my blog with your site…..Your so creative and make it look so easy!
    Thanks!
    Lois

    1. Hi Lois – Isn’t that Walmart stool great? The price and comfy to sit on, too. Painting the monogram is not hard. If you have never done it before – practice a little on some scrap wood to get the hang of it. The stool I painted is in my older daughter’s house. She uses it for extra seating when her friends stop by.

    2. Love this! The contrast looks amnizag and a very creative way of using the stamp. I’ve just discovered you have a nail blog . . . after years of reading your papercraft blog. I was thinking how cool this would be in shades of taupe kind of like wheel tracks!

  2. What type of sealer did you use after painting?
    I am going to be handpainting a picture/ pattern onto the top of a bedside table so am trying to work out what I need to use on top of the paint to protect it that won’t ruin the painted picture.

  3. Diane, thank you for doing this project. I have exactly the same stool (in fact, I have 2 and small round table that was sold together with stool). I have been meaning to do something with them for a while. You inspired me to make a bold move!

  4. Hi,

    I’ve been checking your website for a little while and I must say it is great. It gave me some inspiration and courage to redo some of my furniture. I am renting an apartment at the moment. I repainted a bookcase style headboard, I re-purposed a two-drawer dresser or whatever is that and now I am inspired by the pattern on this chair you made for your daughter to use for two bar stools I found at a local thrifty store. Thank you for all the instructions and all the advises.

  5. OMG…you are amazing. I love this stool project. This is such an inspirational post. Thanks so much for sharing! I would love it if you would link this to our WIW blog party. Hope you can join us!

    Paula
    Ivyandelephants.blogspot.com

  6. This post is so great! As a recent college grad, all my furniture is beat up, hand-me-down stuff from my older brother; that type of thing fits in well in college but does not cut it in the real world. Since I’m just starting out with my job at Dish, every penny saved helps. Thank you for showing me how to work with what I’ve got in such an easy-to-follow way! Usually blogs just tell you vague descriptions of steps that are impossible to replicate. A lot of the time, I find myself glued to HDTV or the DIY network for projects so I am able to pause, rewind and play back steps just to keep up at home! Thankfully I have the Hopper from Dish (a new whole home DVR system) so I have hours upon hours of recording space dedicated to shows that help me revamp my home. I will definitely save your blog as a reference now too!

  7. Love how this turned out, I am searching for old fashion student desks that have seats atached for my grandkiddos to eat at when they are here,this would be a great way to personalize and maybe even lower the running to see who sits where (lol)can you see them all lined up and ready to eat we have 7 at this point. Would be a great way to peronalize so may items. Thank you for always giving such viewer friendly directions,your steps are always so clear.

  8. Hi Diane! This is the first time I have commented on a blog but just have to let you know how much I love your “style”. I found your site while looking for painted furniture designs and first saw the chevron stool…then I fell for your bathroom, then I was drooling over your bedroom…love it all. Thanks for taking the time to share all these fun projects that don’t have to break the budget…mostly time and effort. Keep posting please! Kim

  9. WOW!! Seriously in awe of this. I soooo want to do this now with my new stools that are saddle-style like yours!! Can’t seem to pin this fast enough. GREAT tutorial!!

    {HUGS},
    kristi

  10. Amazing, just amazing. How you find the time is just the start of saying how clever and talented you are. And a steady hand I see. I don’t think I could do this one if my life depended on it.

    And thank you so much for the suggestion for ‘fixing’ my chewed up chair legs. I thought of adding sand or fake sand to the paint, but ugh and if he decides to chew them again, was afraid it would hurt him. He is so sweet. Not really a bad little kissy butt.

    I had considered pvc, but too hard to split it and don’t think it would be pliable enough to get over the bars. Then I considered those plastic shower curtain rod covers that were so popular years back……. but do they still make them and they would probably look cheap too. I knew you would have the answer. Thank you again.

  11. What a fantastic project, Diane! This is a great gift for your daughter’s new place. And your tutorial is so complete. I’m sharing this on my blog as one of my favorite picks on Saturday! (And thank you for the font link – I just downloaded it!)

  12. First of all… Awesome project!! I love it!!
    Just wondering what brand of non-yellowing sealer you used? I have ruined so many projects by using sealers and since yours looks awesome I am hoping you will share :)

    Thanks!!
    Kimberly

  13. These stools are a-ma-zing! What a wonderful housewarming for your daughter, and a blessing to have a super crafty mama!

    Hugs, Tanya :)

  14. Diane,

    I can feel all of the work you put into this!!! (the post alone must have taken forever to put together.)
    I am sure your daughter is going to love it : ) What a sweet mom you are!
    xo
    Ashlyn

    1. Thanks Ashlyn –

      Getting all the photos into Live Writer goes pretty quickly. The hardest part of a project like like is remembering to take a photo after completing each step. :)